Skip to main content

Degradation of PET Plastics Using Metallated Meso Tetra (4-Carboxyphenyl) Porpyrin

By

To combat the environmental and health issue of plastic pollution, we are looking to find a degradation process for plastics. There is a known microorganism phanerochaete chrysosporium that has the ability to degrade PET plastic. We used the enzyme that gives the microorganism this property as a basis for our proposed catalysts. To create the catalyst three different metals; Zinc (Zn), Iron (Fe), and Manganese (Mn) were used to metallate meso Tetra (4-carboxyphenyl) porphyrin (TCPP).

Exploring the Fundamentals of Plastic Degradation

By

 Exposed to the elements, plastic degrades into smaller pieces known as microplastics and nanoplastics.1 These pieces have been found in our terrestrial, aquatic, and atmospheric environment, contaminating our food, water, and air.2 To mitigate this problem, we attempted to synthesize a copper cage that will theoretically break down the plastic to benign monomers of water and carbon. 3

Proposing A Total Synthesis of A Natural Product

By

This project intended to proposing a well-founded and viable total synthesis of a recently isolated natural product molecule. This molecule is structural challenging and interesting, and it has been tested to be potentially antibacterial. Thus, it is important for us to discover a synthetic route of this molecule. During the eight weeks of this summer (2020), we analyzed the structure of this molecule theoretically, and proposed a well-founded synthetic route of this molecule.

Degradation of Azo-dye with Electrochemical Methods

By

The reviewed mechanism, kinetics, and thermodynamics of proton-coupled electron transfer reactions work as the basis for electrochemical degradation of azo-dye. Cyclic voltammetry is applied for the electrochemical studies of this project. A review of metal-organic frameworks and their synthetic routes helps to design better catalysts work for degradation reaction.

Mechanism Determination of Ruthenium-Based TNT Sensor

By

TNT is both toxic and explosive, the detection of TNT represents an environmental and security concern. Dogs are often used for detection, but other methods are needed. This research project originally intended to understand how Ruthenium based TNT sensors function by discovering the mechanism by which Ruthenium’s fluorescence is quenched by TNT. Due to the nature of the summer, majority of my time was spent doing a literature review of previous TNT sensors.

Kinetic Characterization of Intercalating Chemotherapy Drugs Using Temperature Jump Techniques

By

The properties of the binding pathways of intercalating chemotherapy drugs to DNA were studied through literature search and data analysis. The transcription and replication of DNA are key steps to the deadliness of uncontrolled cellular division, or cancer. Characterization of the kinetic properties of the “intercalation” mechanism, the mysterious pathway by which some chemotherapy drugs are capable of halting DNA’s transcription and replication, is where I conducted extensive reading and data analysis this summer.

Bringing Technology Into the Organic Chemistry Lab

By

Due to the current challenges of the world, learning through videos is a crucial part of class preparation. Educational videos offer students an opportunity to learn in a safe environment. They are unique in their ability to allow students to see something first hand but are accessible from anywhere. The goal of this project is to create a series of organic chemistry lab tutorials. This will allow students to view the videos from home and come into the lab with a better understanding of what they are meant to be doing.

Novel Coronavirus

By

Many lives have been impacted ever since the first-time novel corona virus was observed in Wuhan on December 2019. With 5,403,218 confirmed cases of patients who have contracted COVID-19 as of 8/16/2020 along with 170,052 deaths in the United States; it remains vital to understand prevention and advance general public health against COVID-19 as well as progress in finding potential treatments. (Johns Hopkins Resource, 2020) Similarly, on March 13th, 2020 St. Lawrence University transitioned from in-person to online learning in attempt to facilitate social distancing and self-isolation.