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Can We Ethically Commodify Land?
Image
Credit

Tony Hisgett, September 25, 2014

Downloaded from https://www.flickr.com/photos/hisgett/15357071890/in/photolist-pp41ry-poWoZn-pp3RKW-2iR6w49-pp1dAY-pFwXES-ppbTbq-pDkmos-pFwNsy-pp2uCK-oJB6kq-pp2cRD-oJJAvW-5mr48V-4Z7CyC-2j6eUVn-2bN6mex-a34tKk-2iR8bgR-7kjhYx-JYP2TY-7kjhVV-Zu2BHP-CQvWw-Miie-pFt5xR-4P4NN-2hMmgvk-2c5E2h1-NpoMQC-5mviWw-7kTQen-7kTNRB-7kTRkZ-pp3YqE-poWjKv-VYkyPm-4mwFye-4ve6XA-pFdBdV-kU7WZ-nGaHnw-27uv1kM-27eH5nX-WkJgWf-nGaHoA-5mvoEb-nGaHGG-5iumyC-7gBtL8 on October 15, 2020

Class of 2021
Major:
Philosophy
Minor:
African Studies
Outdoor Studies

Edward "Ned" Hallahan is in the class of 2021. He's a philosophy major who is hoping to go to pursue a P.H.D in philosophy. At SLU he's done the Adirondack Semester and studied abroad in Kenya. He's done another research project collecting oral histories of Adirondack artists. He's also worked for North Country Public Radio. Ned is interested in environmental ethics. On-campus, he lives in the Arts Annex, is the treasurer of woodcarving club, and is part of Divest SLU.

Advisor
Description

This paper is about how primarily focusing on wilderness categorization may be a bad thing for environmentalism. Essentially, the paper links the history of capitalism, to the history of wilderness and explores how arguments for wilderness preservation seem to actually contradict many environmentalist goals. If you choose to read the document provided realize that it is a working draft. I'm using this paper as the basis of a grad school writing sample and it will go through major revisions in the coming months. Still, I hope you find it interesting.